Brita.RSS

The question is are you willing to spend $7 on a filter for every batch of Consomme or clarified liquid since they are not reusable. It actually does an excellent job for low tech filtration.
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Nut Oil "Beurre Monte"RSS

In a recent conversation over 3 beers (I had 1-he simultaneously had 2 and a shot) with Eli-San in Atlanta, we discussed the idea of stable emulsions to see what the ultrasonic homogenizer could do. It turns out you can make traditional beurre monte in ratios that can not be achieved by traditional methods because the emulsion ratio is way off. Not only does an ultrasonic homogenizer completely eliminate that issue you can now make beurre monte basically out of any oil and water. Pecan-Hazelnut-Pine Nut-Pistachio-Truffle-Almond-Shellfish Oil. Possibilities are endless. I basically used every single flavor of oil from    LA TOURANGELLE. The Pistachio and Pecan flavors are...........Nuts....ha.  
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Beurre D'or.RSS

Gold Butter is in fact liquid gold with multiple applications. It is achieved by cooking milk powder in clarified butter gently and then infusing with GOLDEN VADOUVAN. You get all the nutty flavors of brown butter combined with the mystery of Vadouvan. I have used it to cook savory granolas and poach Veal, Lamb and shellfish. It carries flavor well particularly in sous-vide. Quite stunning.
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Umami Jus.RSS

The idea for an Umami enhanced intense chicken broth came from a recent meal at    YAKITORI TOTTO  in Manhattan, by far one of my favorite places to eat regardless of cuisine or ambition. The components were Chicken, Ham, Mojama and Kombu. CHICKEN. Pieces of meaty bones and wings marinated with Shoyu-Mirin-Sake and dabbed with towels to dry them, placed on a rack on a roasting pan and refrigerated for 24 hrs in a very cold refrigerator uncovered. They are subsequently roasted till slightly golden. HAM. Benton's ham is sliced thick and dehydrated for 48 hrs till it is the texture of beef jerky. MOJAMA. Simply shaved on a mandoline like Bonito. KOMBU. Must simply be of the highest quality and lightly covered with the whitish surface saline-marine powder. Everything is pressure cooked for 1 hr with 1/2 Onion brulee, 1 Tomato brulee and a few coins of fresh ginger. It is cooled and defatted. Served hot or cold there are multiple applications.  
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Clarified Brown Butter Gin.RSS

After running the     BROWN BUTTER GIN    through the    ROTARY EVAPORATOR   we are left with both a clear gin redolent of the aroma and flavor of brown butter and what turns out to be a non congealing intense brown butter extract.
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Deviled Egg Fried Chicken.RSS

  Deviled Egg Fried Chicken . Deviled Egg Sauce
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Cavitation Flavor Transfer 4. Gin + Brown Butter.RSS

In the     PREVIOUS POST      the Brown Butter Gin was completed. It tastes great and is rather attractive with it's golden hue. Does it need to be clear is the question. Probably not however it would be kind of cool if it was. From a financial standpoint I was trying to figure out how a restaurant maximizes the product based on the production time and all the specialty equipment required. It turns out the answer is actually stupidly simple. We started with 750ml of gin and 454g of butter. The final yield was 650ml of Brown Butter Gin approximately. The brilliance of the product however is that it actually has way too much butter flavor when you make a cocktail with it. We then decided to make a mixture of 50% gin + 50% Brown Butter Gin thus doubling the yield and diluting the flavor. This then extends the yield to making close to 50 cocktails assuming said restaurant uses the gin for 1 specific specialty cocktail and less than 120 seats. I started clarifying the gin using a rotary Evaporator and hopefully will retain much of the characteristic flavor and aroma of brown butter. The evaporator of choice in my cooking lab is the

IKA RV10 Digital.

It is solidly built on a modular system, easy to assemble and use, not terribly expensive with a rather attractive design. Our setup uses a dry ice condenser which is much less expensive and does not require  circulating chillers at additional cost. It is also paired with a Laboport vacuum pump from     KNF-Neuberger. There is a lovely Video from IKA     HERE     demonstrating the machine with a rather trancelike soothing neo-techno soundtrack. IKA's website has a variety of configurations and pricing    HERE.  Results later.....off to play spin the bottle !    
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Cavitation Flavor Transfer 3. Gin + Brown Butter.RSS

Now that the gin has chilled for 8 hours in the freezer there is clear distinction between the Golden hued brown butter gin and the actual melted butter. It has a color similar to 5 year old Sauternes. The last step will be final filtration to remove every minute bit of sediment. A centrifuge should do this effectively for about $6 to $7k however not being in possession of one quite yet I am using the "low-tech" high-tech method which is excellent coffee filter paper. Since practicality obviously dictates nobody has time to watch gin drip for 6 hours, aforementioned coffee filter will be inserted into a    BUCHNER FUNNEL    with a vacuum pump from our good friends at    KNF    connected to it. 10 minutes....Boom......perfectly filtered 650ml of golden hued brown butter gin. Yield loss is minimal, I started with 700ml. vacuum Pump is about $500, flask is about $30. Using a chinoise will be a waste of time as it would take too long and the liquid needs to stay cold because you do not actually want any butter to pass through to avoid an oily consistency. The novelty of end use cocktails is to have the intense flavor without the oiliness of actual brown butter. The final part of this exercise is to pass the brown butter gin through a rotary evaporator tomorrow to see what happens regarding clarification and residual flavor. Flavor wise based on the same exercice performed with a standard blender, Ultrasonic Homogenization makes a huge difference in the flavor of the final product as well as the color.
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Cavitation Flavor Transfer 2. Gin + Brown Butter.RSS

After freezing the emulsion overnight, I assumed by conventional wisdom the butter would freeze and separate leaving the gin below. Unfortunately what happens is the whole mass just stays frozen as a slurry. It therefore requires a measure of defrosting to achieve the separation. I assume one can simply leave it at room temperature so as to avoid applying too much heat and losing some alcohol. To speed up the process I used a "warm to the touch" water bath which forces the butter to melt. It is interesting to see that ultrasonic homogenizations still stay emulsified while frozen and presents many interesting possibilities.  After freezing for 12 hrs there is no separation.                                               Using a wide surface area water bath to defrost.
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Cavitation Flavor Transfer 1. Gin + Brown Butter.RSS

Fat washed liquor is nothing new however  with everything in the modern kitchen there is a continuous quest to increase flavor, reduce time and increase yield of any process. The photo sequence below shows the ultrasonic homogenization of Gin and Brown Butter. Through prior tests 2 specific things are imperative. The first is that it is important to use a wider shallow pot with increased surface area as it will actually be the burnt solids that transfer most of the flavor after one scrapes the bottom of the pan. You must also prepare a water bath your pan can fit into to arrest the browning of the butter. The second point is that both your gin and homogenizing vessel must be well chilled and preferably in the freezer as cavitation produces just a slight bit of heat. In less than 1 minute the suspension in the initial  picture is turned into a light mayonnaise consistency. In a standard blender situation Brown Butter Gin does work but it seems the shearing method of ultrasound could transfer more flavor. At this point one just has to freeze the mass so separate the butter and gin and pass the liquid through a fine filter.   It also is possible to cook milk powder in the butter to increase brown butter flavor while using less butter.
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